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19.5 Profound Quotes By Carl Jung.

That Will Help Us To Better Understand Our Self? 2017 Style.

Section. 1.

Courtesy of Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia:

This article is about making 2017 sense of this Scientifically evaluated Biological Process, using perhaps for the first time in history...

THE MIND.

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Introduction.

Section. 2.

It is said. One of the things one can love about Carl Jung - is the fact that he was a deep philosophical thinker who examined all aspects of the (his) self when writing about the Human experience.

As one will see in the quotes below, Jung was clear on the notion that we are spiritual beings and that having a spiritual relationship with oneself truly helps us to understand the deeper aspects of who we are.

To some, this idea translates to religion - to finding solace in the existence of something greater than oneself.

However this may be a fickle form of spirituality and one that does not truly help a Person get to the core of who they are or, alternatively, who they are not.

According to Scholars. Carl Jung was one of the creators of modern depth, which seeks to facilitate a conversation with the unconscious energies which move through each of us.

He contributed many ideas which continue to inform contemporary life: complex, archetype, persona, shadow, anima and animus, personality typology, dream interpretation, individuation and many other ideas.

He had a deep appreciation of our creative life and considered spirituality - a central part of the Human journey.

This summation of his life and work connects deeply to what Collective Evolution is all about and shares much in common with  the inspiration to create the platform in the first place.

In putting together the quotes in this article,

One has gained an even deeper appreciation for Jung and his work, and uncovered the conscious themes that were apparent throughout his teachings.

He was clearly a deep thinker with an intimate knowledge of his inner being.

Jung also had an appreciation for astrology which, over the past few years, scholars have begun to understand more and more and see profound value in.

This is not talking about opening a daily paper and reading a generalize horoscope, but true astrology.

Something many of us have never been properly exposed to and thus do not understand the real meaning of, or value.

Maybe someone will make a short documentary on this one day!

Question. 1. Meanwhile may we take some time to appreciate Carl Jung his work and the part it played in modern day Psychological Treatments - as well as the possibility of Self Help through some of his many quotes.

Answer. 1. Of course as there are many facets too many to cover here we will start with and understanding of the man himself...  Drawing 2017 conclusions as we go... 

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Carl Jung.

Section. 3.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

A portrait of Jung, unknown date.

Carl Gustav Jung; 26 July 1875 - 6 June 1961 was a Swiss Psychiatrist and Psychoanalyst who founded Analytical Psychology.

His work has been influential not only in Psychiatry but also in Anthropology, Archaeology, Literature, Philosophy and religious studies.

As a notable research scientist based at the famous Burghölzli hospital, under Eugen Bleuler, he came to the attention of the Viennese founder of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud.

The two men conducted a lengthy correspondence and collaborated on an initially joint vision of Human Psychology.

Freud saw in the younger man the potential heir he had been seeking to carry on his; "new science" of Psychoanalysis.

Jung's researches and personal vision, however, made it impossible for him to bend to his older colleague's doctrine and a breach became inevitable.

This break was to have historic as well as painful personal repercussions that have lasted to this day.

Jung was also an artist, craftsman and builder as well as a prolific writer.

Many of his works were not published until after his death and some are still awaiting publication. 

Among the central concepts of Analytical Psychology is individuation - the lifelong psychological process of differentiation of the self; out of each individual's conscious and unconscious elements.

Jung considered it to be the main task of Human development.

He created some of the best known Psychological concepts, including Synchronicity, Archetypal Phenomena, the Collective Unconscious, the Psychological complex and extraversion and introversion.

Conclusion. Whilst it is helpful to remember this discussion; 19.5 Profound Quotes By Carl Jung.

That Will Help To Better Understand ourself? 2017 Style - as brilliant as Carl Jung's findings were in his day; still today the treatment of Mind related disorders, often referred to as Psychological or Mental disorders is not very successful.

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Biography.

Section. 4.

Early years.

Childhood family.

The Clergy House in Kleinhüningen, Basel where Jung grew up.

Carl Gustav Jung was born in Kesswil, in the Swiss canton of Thurgau, on 26 July 1875 as the second and first surviving son of Paul Achilles Jung 1842-1896 and Emilie Preiswerk 1848-1923.

Their first Child, born in 1873, was a boy named Paul who survived only a few days.

Being the youngest son of a noted Basel physician of German descent, also called Karl Gustav Jung  1794-1864, whose hopes of achieving a fortune never materialised, Paul Jung did not progress beyond the status of an impoverished rural pastor in the Swiss Reformed Church; his wife had also grown up in a large family, whose Swiss roots went back five centuries.

Emilie his wife - was the youngest Child of a distinguished Basel churchman and academic, Samuel Preiswerk 1799-1871 and his second wife.

Preiswerk was antistes, the title given to the head of the Reformed clergy in the city, as well as a Hebraist, author and editor, who taught Paul Jung as his professor of Hebrew at Basel University.

When Jung was six months old, his father was appointed to a more prosperous parish in Laufen, but the tension between his Parents was growing.

Emilie Jung was an eccentric and depressed woman; she spent considerable time in her bedroom where she said that spirits visited her at night.

Although she was normal during the day, Jung recalled that at night his Mother became strange and mysterious.

He reported that one night he saw a faintly luminous and indefinite figure coming from her room with a head detached from the neck and floating in the air in front of the body.

Jung had a better relationship with his Father.

Jung's Mother left Laufen for several months of hospitalization near Basel for an unknown physical ailment.

His father took the boy to be cared for by Emilie Jung's unmarried sister in Basel, but he was later brought back to his Father's residence.

Emilie Jung's continuing bouts of absence and often depressed mood influenced her son's attitude towards women - one of "innate unreliability."

This was a view that he later called; "the handicap I started off with."

He believed it contributed to his sometimes patriarchal views of Women, but these were common in the society of his time.

After three years of living in Laufen, Paul Jung requested a transfer; he was called to Kleinhüningen, next to Basel in 1879.

The relocation brought Emilie Jung closer into contact with her family and lifted her melancholy.

When he was nine years old, Jung's sister Johanna Gertrud 1884-1935 was born. Known in the family as "Trudi," she later became a secretary to her brother.

Conclusion. In keeping with the earlier conclusion - yet not wishing to be disrespectful to Carl Jung.

If one is able to comprehend the power of his own words (in red below) in the process of making the link between the true cause of illness and why it has in 2017; defied all efforts to bring about a cure. 

But the tension between his Parents was growing.

Emilie Jung was an eccentric and depressed Woman;

He reported that one night he saw a faintly luminous and indefinite figure coming from her room with a head detached from the neck and floating in the air in front of the body.

Depressed mood influenced her son's attitude towards Women - one of "innate unreliability."

"The handicap I started off with."

Then the possibility exists as an understanding - as to why no treatments as of to date appear to offer long-term relief of illness symptoms - known as a cure. 

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Childhood Memories.

Section. 6.

Jung was a solitary and introverted Child.

From Childhood, he believed that, like his Mother, he had two personalities - a modern Swiss citizen and a personality more suited to the 18th century.

Conclusion. Whilst we must forgive Carl Jung for what it appears in disallowing modern treatments to show efficacy based on his understandings - this section makes it clear; he was in fact working on the premise of avoidance of that what was too dark for him to comprehend the link between in his words the Unconscious and Conscious.

"Personality Number 1."

As he termed it, was a typical schoolboy living in the era of the time.

"Personality Number 2."

Was a dignified, authoritative and influential man from the past.

Although Jung was close to both Parents, he was disappointed by his father's academic approach to faith.

A number of Childhood memories made lifelong impressions on him.

As a boy, he carved a tiny mannequin into the end of the wooden ruler from his pencil case and placed it inside the case.

He added a stone, which he had painted into upper and lower halves and hid the case in the attic.

Periodically, he would return to the mannequin, often bringing tiny sheets of paper with messages inscribed on them in his own secret language.

He later reflected that this ceremonial act brought him a feeling of inner peace and security.

Years later, he discovered similarities between his personal experience and the practices associated with totems in indigenous cultures, such as the collection of soul-stones near Arlesheim or the tjurungas of Australia.

He concluded that his intuitive ceremonial act was an unconscious ritual, which he had practiced in a way that was strikingly similar to those in distant locations which he, as a young boy, knew nothing about.

His observations about symbols, archetypes and the collective unconscious were inspired, in part, by these early experiences combined with his later research.

At the age of 12, shortly before the end of his first year at the Humanistisches Gymnasium in Basel, Jung was pushed to the ground by another boy so hard that he momentarily lost consciousness.

Jung later recognized that the incident was his fault, indirectly.

A thought then came to him. "now you will not have to go to school anymore."

From then on, whenever he walked to school or began homework, he fainted.

He remained at home for the next six months - until he overheard his Father speaking hurriedly to a visitor about the boy's future ability to support himself.

They suspected he had epilepsy.

Confronted with the reality of his family's poverty, he realized the need for academic excellence.

He went into his Father's study and began poring over Latin grammar.

He fainted three more times but eventually overcame the urge and did not faint again.

This event, Jung later recalled, "was when I learned what a neurosis is."

Conclusion...

Although Jung was close to both Parents, he was disappointed by his father's academic approach to faith.

A number of Childhood memories made lifelong impressions on him.

He later reflected that this ceremonial act brought him a feeling of inner peace and security.

Jung later recognized that the incident was his fault, indirectly.

"Now you will not have to go to school anymore."

From then on, whenever he walked to school or began homework, he fainted.

Confronted with the reality of his family's poverty, he realized the need for academic excellence.

He went into his Father's study and began poring over Latin grammar.

He fainted three more times but eventually overcame the urge and did not faint again.

It is clear if one can make the connection that his Parents most certainly without any form of malice were at the cause of not only Carl's Jung's early demise - but the creation; as Creativity is the Brakes on Madness, of his Psychological Understandings still in use today.

Yet, as he was not able to see the connection was unable to see - if only but much later; his work and findings were compromised by his own life story.

Demonstrated by the growing thought I have worked with for the past Thirty Four Year plus - late 2017.

"That all illness is caused by Parents - thus is an advantage not in the slightest a disadvantage."

Thus - from the earliest of his beginnings formed the foundation and creation of his so-called Duel Personalities. Called today by two names: Manic Depression and the latter. Bi Polar Disorder and or Schizophrenia .  

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University Studies and Early Career.

Section. 7.

Jung did not plan to study psychiatry since it was not considered prestigious at the time.

But, studying a psychiatric textbook, he became very excited when he discovered that psychoses are personality diseases.

His interest was immediately captured - it combined the biological and the spiritual, exactly what he was searching for.

In 1895 Jung began to study medicine at the University of Basel.

Barely a year later in 1896, his father Paul died and left the family near destitute.

They were helped out by relatives who also contributed to Jung's studies.

During his student days, he entertained his contemporaries with the family legend, that his paternal grandfather was the illegitimate son of Wolfgang Goethe and his German great-grandmother, Sophie Ziegler.

In later life, he pulled back from this tale, saying only that Sophie was a friend of Goethe's niece.

In 1900 Jung began working at the Burghölzli psychiatric hospital in Zürich with Eugen Bleuler.

Bleuler was already in communication with the Austrian neurologist Sigmund Freud.

Jung's dissertation, published in 1903, was titled On the Psychology and Pathology of So-Called Occult Phenomena.

In 1906 he published Studies in Word Association and later sent a copy of this book to Freud.

Eventually a close friendship and a strong professional association developed between the elder Freud and Jung, which left a sizeable correspondence.

For six years they cooperated in their work.

In 1912, however, Jung published Wandlungen und Symbole der Libido - known in English as Psychology of the Unconscious, which made manifest the developing theoretical divergence between the two.

Consequently, their personal and professional relationship fractured - each stating that the other was unable to admit he could possibly be wrong.

After the culminating break in 1913, Jung went through a difficult and pivotal psychological transformation, exacerbated by the outbreak of the First World War.

Henri Ellenberger called Jung's intense experience; a "creative illness" and compared it favorably to Freud's own period of what he called neurasthenia and hysteria.

Conclusion...

Psychoses are personality diseases.

It combined the biological and the spiritual, exactly what he was searching for.

Study medicine at the University of Basel.

Psychology and Pathology of So-Called Occult Phenomena.

Word Association.

Psychology of the Unconscious,

Each stating that the other was unable to admit he could possibly be wrong.

Jung went through a difficult and pivotal psychological transformation, exacerbated by the outbreak of the First World War.

A "creative illness" and compared it favorably to Freud's own period of what he called neurasthenia and hysteria.

Conclusion... From Jung's comment. "Exactly what he was searching for," one should be able to see he was either relieving an Anxiety he could not relieve in any other way - or searching for an understanding he had not thus far found or received.

Yet was - albeit in a hidden manner able to temporally relieve the anxiety by seemingly working out Psychosis are personality diseases and then losing his way of understanding the Mind by studying medicine and linking Psychology, Pathology, the occult, and word associations that lead him to what he felt at the time as correct. The Psychology of the Unconscious.

Then and as a result standing so firm in his belief it not only destroyed His and Freud's personal and professional friendship he was thereby unable to makes sense of the position he was now in had no option again to relieve the now growing anxiety but to blame his own psychological downfall onto the first world war.

As demonstrated by;  A "creative illness" and compared it favorably to Freud's own period of what he called Neurasthenia and Hysteria.  

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Wartime Army Service.

Section. 8.

During World War I Jung was drafted as an army Doctor and soon made commandant of an internment camp for British officers and soldiers.

The Swiss were neutral and obliged to intern personnel from either side of the conflict who crossed their frontier to evade capture.

Jung worked to improve the conditions of soldiers stranded in neutral territory and encouraged them to attend university courses.

Conclusion. Whilst one must recognise the sterling contribution Carl Jung made to the war effort - it does pose the question. "What was the true and long term effect on his Psychological Studies," at what one may consider, a most crucial time in the understandings required in the ever increasing illnesses suffered by the Human Population that defied the best treatments of the day, where no one knew and still do not know why.

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Marriage.

Section. 9.

In 1903, Jung married Emma Rauschenbach, seven years his junior and the elder daughter of a wealthy industrialist in eastern Switzerland Johannes Rauschenbach-Schenck and his wife.

Rauschenbach was the owner, among other concerns, of IWC Schaffhausen - the International Watch Company, manufacturers of luxury time-pieces.

Upon Rauschenbach's death in 1905, his two daughters and their husbands became owners of the business.

Jung's brother-in-law became the principal proprietor, but the Jung's remained shareholders in a thriving business that ensured the family's financial security for decades.

Emma Jung, whose education had been limited, demonstrated considerable ability and interest in her husband's research and threw herself into studies and acted as his assistant at Burghölzli.

She eventually became a noted psychoanalyst in her own right.

They had five Children: Agathe, Gret, Franz, Marianne and Helene.

The marriage lasted until Emma's death in 1955.

During his marriage, Jung engaged in extramarital relationships.

His alleged affairs with Sabina Spielrein and Toni Wolff were the most widely discussed.

Though it was mostly taken for granted that Jung's relationship with Spielrein included a sexual relationship, this assumption has been disputed, in particular by Henry Zvi Lothane.

Conclusion...

If one is unwilling or unable to link the past present and indeed; the future we make as a result of our past history - then one can and indeed must; make the conclusion.

Jung's marriage was in reality, little more than a sham, that in part contributed to the eventual outcome of his work but at the same time destroyed it from have a far bigger impact on the way we all view mental illnesses in the modern world of late 2017.

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Relationship with Freud.

Meeting and Collaboration.

Section. 10.

Jung was thirty when he sent his Studies in Word Association to Sigmund Freud in Vienna in 1906.

The two men met for the first time the following year and Jung recalled the discussion between himself and Freud as interminable.

He recalled that they talked almost unceasingly for thirteen hours.

Six months later, the then 50-year-old Freud sent a collection of his latest published essays to Jung in Zurich.

This marked the beginning of an intense correspondence and collaboration that lasted six years and ended in May 1913.

At that time Jung resigned as the chairman of the International Psychoanalytical Association, a position to which he had been elected with Freud's support.

Group photo 1909 in front of Clark University.

Front row, Sigmund Freud, G. Stanley Hall, Carl Jung.

Back row, Abraham Brill, Ernest Jones, Sándor Ferenczi.

Jung and Freud influenced each other during the intellectually formative years of Jung's life.

Jung had become interested in Psychiatry as a student by reading Psychopathia Sexualis by Richard von Krafft-Ebing.

Psychopathia Sexualis - Psychopathy of Sex, by Richard Freiherr von Krafft-Ebing, is one of the first texts to write about sexual pathology.

First published in 1886 with the subtitle; "with Special Reference to the Antipathic Sexual Instinct: A Medico-Forensic Study,"

The book details a wide range of paraphilias, with a special emphasis on male homosexuality - the "antipathic instinct" of the subtitle. Krafft-Ebing also coined the terms sadism and masochism in the book.

The Psychopathia Sexualis is notable for being one of the earliest works on homosexuality.

Krafft-Ebing combined Karl Ulrichs' Urning theory with Bénédict Morel's theory of disease and concluded that most homosexuals have a mental illness caused by degenerate heredity.

The book was controversial at the time, arousing the anger of the church in particular.

The book had a considerable influence on continental European forensic psychiatry in the first part of the 20th century.

In 1900, Jung completed his degree and started work as an intern - voluntary doctor, under the psychiatrist, Eugen Bleuler at Burghölzli Hospital.

It was Bleuler who introduced him to the writings of Freud by asking him to write a review of. The Interpretation of Dreams 1899.

In 1905 Jung was appointed as a permanent; 'senior,' Doctor at the hospital and also became a lecturer Privatdozent in the medical faculty of Zurich University.

In that period Psychology as a science was still in its early stages, but Jung became a qualified proponent of Freud's new "Psycho-Analysis."

At the time, Freud needed collaborators and pupils to validate and spread his ideas.

Burghölzli was a renowned Psychiatric clinic in Zurich and Jung's research had already gained him international recognition.

Preceded by a lively correspondence, Jung met Freud for the first time, in Vienna on 3 March 1907.

In 1908, Jung became an editor of the newly founded Yearbook for Psychoanalytical and Psychopathological Research.

in 1909, Jung traveled with Freud and the Hungarian psychoanalyst Sándor Ferenczi to the United States; they took part in a conference at Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts.

The conference at Clark University was planned by the psychologist G. Stanley Hall and included twenty-seven distinguished psychiatrists, neurologists and psychologists.

It represented a watershed in the acceptance of psychoanalysis in North America.

This forged welcome links between Jung and influential Americans.

Jung returned to the United States the next year for a brief visit.

In 1910, Jung became Chairman for Life of the International Psychoanalytical Association with Freud's support.

Freud would come to call Jung; "his adopted eldest son, his crown prince and successor."

Conclusion.

Psychopathia Sexualis.

Voluntary Doctor, under the Psychiatrist, Eugen Bleuler at Burghölzli Hospital.

The Interpretation of Dreams 1899.

In that period psychology as a science was still in its early stages, but Jung became a qualified proponent of Freud's new "Psycho-Analysis."

In reading this section it is reasonable to consider. Jung in realty discovered nothing or very little of real influence of his own - only working and adapting others ideas; nothing wrong with this as we all learn all we know in this same manner.

However. When one reads the abstract of Psychopathia of Sexualis and includes the interpretation of Dreams one is left to ponder the state of mind Jung was really in when he became a voluntary Doctor and then in a period of great and exiting new findings had too concede to Freud's work of Psychoanalyses, Psychoanalytical and Psychopathological; that was still in the research stage.

With the essence being on Psychopathological...

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Psychoanalytical and Psychopathological Research.

Section. 11.

Psychopathology. Is the scientific study of mental disorders, including efforts to understand their genetic, biological, psychological and social causes; effective classification schemes course across all stages of development manifestations and treatment.

The term may also refer to the manifestation of behaviors that indicate the presence of a mental disorder.

The word psychopathology has a Greek origin: 'psyche' means "soul," 'pathos' is defined as "suffering" and 'logos' is "the study of." Wholly.

Psychopathology is defined as the origin of mental disorders, how they develop and the symptoms they might produce in a Person.

Patients with mental disorders are normally treated by psychiatrists, or psychologists, who both specialize in mental health and diagnose and treat patients through medication or psychotherapy.

These professionals systematically diagnose individuals with mental disorders using specific diagnostic criteria and symptomatology found within the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders..

Conclusion...

Leaving one to ponder.

Did the findings from genetic and biological studies justify the efforts utilised with successful outcomes from treatments; or did the term, 'psyche' meaning "soul," 'pathos' defined as "suffering" and 'logos,' an opinion.

Demonstrate medications these professionals systematically used to treat symptoms of Mind and Body as a diagnoses of individuals with mental disorders using specific diagnostic criteria and symptomatology found within the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - never proved their worth.

As the as the Mind well knows. The Soul does not in reality exist.

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Divergence and Break.

Section. 12.

Jung outside Burghölzli in 1910.

While Jung worked on his Wandlungen und Symbole der Libido - Psychology of the Unconscious, tensions became manifest between him and Freud because of their disagreements over the nature of libido and Religion.

Jung de-emphasized the importance of sexual development and focused on the Collective Unconscious: the part of the Unconscious that contains memories and ideas that Jung believed were inherited from ancestors.

While he did think that libido was an important source for personal growth, unlike Freud, Jung did not believe that libido alone was responsible for the formation of the core personality.

Jung believed his personal development was influenced by factors he felt were unrelated to sexuality.

In 1912 these tensions came to a peak because Jung felt severely slighted after Freud visited his colleague Ludwig Binswanger in Kreuzlingen without paying him a visit in nearby Zurich, an incident Jung referred to as. "The Kreuzlingen gesture."

Shortly thereafter, Jung again traveled to the United States and gave the Fordham University lectures, a six-week series, which were published as The Theory of Psychoanalysis - 1912.

While they contain some remarks on Jung's dissenting view on the libido, they represent largely; a "Psychoanalytical Jung" and not the theory of Analytical Psychology, for which he became famous in the following decades.

Another primary disagreement with Freud stemmed from their differing concepts of the Unconscious.

Jung saw Freud's theory of the Unconscious as incomplete and unnecessarily negative and inelastic.

According to Jung, Freud conceived the Unconscious solely as a repository of repressed emotions and desires.

Jung's observations overlap to an extent with Freud's model of the Unconscious, what Jung called; the "Personal Unconscious," but his hypothesis is more about a process than a static model and he also proposed the existence of a second, overarching form of the unconscious beyond the personal, that he named the Psychoid – a term borrowed from Driesch, but with a somewhat altered meaning.

The Collective Unconscious, is not so much a 'geographical location,' but a deduction from the alleged ubiquity of archetypes over space and time.

Freud had actually mentioned a collective level of psychic functioning - but saw it primarily as an appendix to the rest of the psyche.

In November 1912, Jung and Freud met in Munich for a meeting among prominent colleagues to discuss psychoanalytical journals.

At a talk about a new psychoanalytic essay on Amenhotep IV, Jung expressed his views on how it related to actual conflicts in the psychoanalytic movement.

While Jung spoke, Freud suddenly fainted and Jung carried him to a couch.

Jung and Freud personally met for the last time in September 1913 for the Fourth International Psychoanalytical Congress in Munich.

Jung gave a talk on psychological types, the introverted and extraverted type in analytical psychology.

This constituted the introduction of some of the key concepts which came to distinguish Jung's work from Freud's in the next half century.

Conclusion...

Psychology of the Unconscious.

Libido.

Religion.

Collective unconscious:  unconscious  believed were inherited from ancestors.

Libido was an important source for personal growth - libido alone was responsible for the formation of the core personality.

Unrelated to sexuality.

The Theory of Psychoanalysis - 1912.

Analytical Psychology,  differing concepts of the Unconscious.

Unconscious as incomplete and Unnecessarily negative and inelastic.

Unconscious solely as a repository of repressed emotions and desires.

Freud's model of the Unconscious,

Personal unconscious.  hypothesis is more about a process than a static model.

He also proposed the existence of a second, overarching form of the Unconscious beyond the Personal, that he named the Psychoid.

Collective Unconscious, is not so much a Geographical location,' but a deduction.  

Psychic functioning - but saw it primarily as an appendix to the rest of the Psyche.

While Jung spoke, Freud suddenly fainted and Jung carried him to a couch.

The introverted and extraverted type in Analytical Psychology.

From these extracts from Jung's words or works we can consider.

If the psychology of the Unconscious is derived from what one may call innate information should that in reality enter into the process of understanding and evaluating Human Life.

And in the same manner should a Person's actual innate Libido - rather than a dysfunctional Libido; figure in the understanding of the damaged Psychological process of a Person.

If we are able to accept No as the only conclusion to these two items - should we not also include Religion and Gender Identity as having no value in the therapeutic process; for is it not a Person we should be applying treatment too, not a description or a convenient coverall label.

In addition was Freud's fainting more an act of suppression of Carl Jung and his viewpoint - rather than an emotional or physical mind body function. 

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Midlife Isolation.

Section. 13.

It was the publication of Jung's book Psychology of the Unconscious in 1912 that led to the break with Freud.

Letters they exchanged show Freud's refusal to consider Jung's ideas.

This rejection caused what Jung described in his 1962 autobiography, Memories, Dreams, Reflections, as a "resounding censure."

Everyone he knew dropped away except for two of his colleagues.

Jung described his book as; "an attempt, only partially successful, to create a wider setting for medical psychology and to bring the whole of the psychic phenomena within its purview." The book was later revised and retitled. "Symbols of Transformation in 1922."

Conclusion...

Psychology of the Unconscious.

Resounding censure.

Everyone he knew dropped away except for two of his colleagues.

An attempt, only partially successful.

Symbols of Transformation in 1922.

It must surely be a consideration this is where the suppressive effects of Jung's: Father, Freud and others begins to have the effect desired leading to his realisation his attempt was only partially successful and where his was unable to improve and update - by seeing it was not a possibility for the Psychology of the Unconscious - to be an affective understanding of the Human frame and its activity in illness confirmed by the requirement to rename to Symbols of Transformation.

As Psychological; is a Symptom, a diagnoses or a description - not a cause of Mental and Biological ill health.

Therefore is only used as a relief of Anxiety of the researcher or practitioner attempting to bring about an improvement by management techniques of ever changing symptoms yet still in 2017 not understanding the uniqueness of every Human Mind and Body and it subconscious Mind as the store of all life information and activities.

Psychological...

Of, affecting, or arising in the Mind; related to the Mental and Emotional state of a Person.

The victim had sustained physical and Psychological damage.

Relating to Psychology.

Psychological research.

Of an ailment or problem having a mental rather than a physical cause.

It was concluded that the Pain was Psychological.

Thus it must therefore be a serious consideration...

Carl Jung's findings - were in fact a Lead Jacket of suppression, that still in 2017 effects every practitioner working to improve the Psychological and or Biological Health of a Person.

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London 1913–14.

Section. 14.

Jung spoke at meetings of the Psycho-Medical Society in London in 1913 and 1914.

His travels were soon interrupted by the war, but his ideas continued to receive attention in England primarily through the efforts of Constance Long who translated and published the first English volume of his collected writings.

Conclusion...

Is it possible Jung only received such attention - because the growing desire of the Medical Profession to ensure all illness was Biological and nothing to do with the Mind and was therefore susceptible to Medications; he became a convert and thus only said what others desired to hear and not His truth or even his Real Truth.

The reason today no treatment exists that is able to satisfactorily relieve for more that a short time any Mind related illness as the so called Conscious Mind thoughts, cannot be medicated.

As the Unconscious and Conscious Minds do not exist - being only a way of explaining away Human Mind Body Activity that is not well understood.  

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 The Red Book.

Section. 15.

In 1913, at the age of thirty-eight, Jung experienced a horrible. "Confrontation with his Unconscious."

He saw visions and heard voices.

He worried at times that he was "menaced by a psychosis;" or was; "doing a schizophrenia."

He decided that it was valuable experience and, in private, he induced hallucinations or, in his words, "active imaginations."

He recorded everything he felt in small journals.

Jung began to transcribe his notes into a large red leather-bound book, on which he worked intermittently for sixteen years.

Jung left no posthumous instructions about the final disposition of what he called the Liber Novus or the Red Book.

Sonu Shamdasani, an historian of psychology from London, tried for three years to persuade Jung's resistant heirs to have it published.

Up to mid-September 2008, fewer than two dozen People had seen it.

Ulrich Hoerni, Jung's grandson who manages the Jung archives, decided to publish it to raise the additional funds needed when the Philemon Foundation was founded.

In 2007, two technicians for DigitalFusion, working with New York City publishers W. W. Norton & Company, scanned the manuscript with a 10,200-pixel scanner.

It was published on 7 October 2009, in German with; a "separate English translation along with Shamdasani's introduction and footnotes" at the back of the book, according to Sara Corbett for The New York Times. She wrote, "The book is "bombastic, baroque and like so much else about Carl Jung, a willful oddity, synched with an antediluvian and mystical reality."

The Rubin Museum of Art in New York City displayed the original Red Book journal, as well as some of Jung's original small journals, from 7 October 2009 to 15 February 2010.

According to them. "During the period in which he worked on this book - Jung developed his principal theories of archetypes, Collective Unconscious and the Process of Individuation." Two-thirds of the pages bear Jung's illuminations of the text.

Conclusion...

Confrontation with the Unconscious.

He saw visions and heard voices.

Menaced by a Psychosis;" or was; "doing a Schizophrenia."

In private, he induced Hallucinations or, in his words, "Active Imaginations.

The book is "bombastic, baroque and like so much else about Carl Jung, a willful oddity, synched with an antediluvian and mystical reality.

Is it possible that as Jung left no posthumous instructions about the final disposition of what he called the Liber Novus or the Red Book; following a realisation his real findings will be hidden from public view by the act of Professional Colleague suppression.

The proof of this may well be observed by the fact of the 100,000 recognised and diagnosed illnesses there is still not one of where the true cause is known and not one of them has a definitive cure = no more illness and no more medications.

With a further confirmation within the comment. "The book is "bombastic, baroque and like so much else about Carl Jung, a willful oddity, synched with an antediluvian and mystical reality.

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Travels.

Section. 16.

Jung emerged from his period of isolation late in nineteen eighteen/nineteen with the publication of several journal articles, followed in 1921 through the publication of one of his most influential books.

There followed a decade of active publication, interspersed with overseas travels.

Conclusion. Is it a possibility the Cumulative effect of his Father and professional colleagues suppression - contributed or indeed caused Jung's period of isolation during which time his Scientific Inquiry once again created a process of. Creativity being the brakes on the Madness that without it his life may well have come to a conclusion sooner than the tender age of 85.

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England 1920, 1923, 1925.

Section. 17.

Constance Long arranged for Jung to deliver a seminar in Cornwall in 1920.

Another seminar was held in 1923, this one organized by Helton Godwin Baynes - known as Peter and another in 1925.

Conclusion. One would wonder if this was the support the Jung required that created the seedbed for treatment for so called Psychological disorders to be more successful that they perhaps would have been without the timely intervention.

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United States 1924-25, 1936-37.

Section. 18.

Jung made a more extensive trip westward in the winter of 1924-5, financed and organized by Fowler McCormick and George Porter.

Of particular value to Jung was a visit with Chief Mountain Lake of the Taos Pueblo near Taos, New Mexico.

Jung made another trip to America in 1936, giving lectures in New York and New England for his growing group of American followers.

He returned in 1937 to deliver the Terry Lectures, later published as Psychology and Religion, at Yale University.

Conclusion. Leaving one to ask. "Is there really a slot in the understanding of Psychological Disorders that includes Religion;" or was this the out come of the brakes on Madness that somewhat destroyed the truth regarding the efficacy of any treatments of psychological disorders.

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East Africa.

Section. 19.

In October 1925, Jung embarked on his most ambitious expedition, the "Bugishu Psychological Expedition" to East Africa.

He was accompanied by Peter Baynes and an American associate, George Beckwith.

On the voyage to Africa, they became acquainted with an English woman named Ruth Bailey, who joined their safari a few weeks later.

The group traveled through Kenya and Uganda to the slopes of Mount Elgon, where Jung hoped to increase his understanding of "Primitive Psychology" through conversations, with the culturally isolated residents of that area.

Later he concluded that the major insights he had gleaned had more to do with himself and the European Psychology in which he had been raised.

Conclusion...

Are we really to believe as Jung hoped to increase his understanding of "Primitive Psychology" through conversations, with the culturally isolated residents of that area he really expanded the understanding of Human Psychology - or is it better said; as he concluded, that the major insights he had gleaned...

Had more to do with himself and the desire as they say of his journey of self discovery.

And thus; only confused the European Psychology in which he had been raised.

Thereby Leaving as many questions with no answers as answers with no questions.

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India.

Section. 20.

In December 1937, Jung left Zurich again for an extensive tour of India with Fowler McCormick.

In India, he felt himself; "under the direct influence of a foreign culture," for the first time.

In Africa, his conversations had been strictly limited by the language barrier, but in India he was able to converse extensively.

Hindu philosophy became an important element in his understanding of the role of symbolism and the life of the Unconscious, though he avoided a meeting with Ramana Maharshi.

He described Ramana as being absorbed in "the self," but admits to not understanding Ramana's self-realisation or what he actually did do.

He also admits that his field of Psychology is not competent in understanding the eastern insight of the Atman; "the self."

Jung became seriously ill on this trip and endured two weeks of delirium in a Calcutta hospital.

After 1938, his travels were confined to Europe.

Conclusion...

Surely if one truly understands Human Psychology there is no necessity to: "feel under the direct influence of a foreign culture,"

No more than be placed in a position of not understanding - although one does not have to agree with; Ramana's Self Realisation and surely the Self; is the Self in any Language, Religion or Culture.

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Final Publications and Death.

Section. 21.

C. G. Jung Institute, Küsnacht, Switzerland.

Jung continued to publish books until the end of his life, including Flying Saucers: A Modern Myth of Things Seen in the Skies 1959, which analyzed the archetypal meaning and possible Psychological significance of the reported observations of UFOs.

He also enjoyed a friendship with an English Roman Catholic priest, Father Victor White, who corresponded with Jung after he had published his controversial. Answer to Job.

Jung died on 6 June 1961 at Küsnacht, after a short illness.

He had been beset by circulatory diseases.

Conclusion...

One has to wonder if...

"A modern Myth of things seen in the skies," was no more than an adaptation or reinterpretation of the hidden or visible message of. "Freud's Frogs into Princess."

However; if one were able to look beyond the message and observe the truth - would not the reason for Jung's apparent lifetime of Circulatory Disease be at the core.  

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Thoughts.

Section. 22.

Jung's thoughts was formed by early family influences, which on the maternal side were a blend of interest in the occult and in solid reformed academic theology.

On his father's side were two important figures, his grandfather the physician and academic scientist, Karl Gustav Jung and the family's actual connection with Lotte Kestner, the niece of the German polymath, Johann Wolfgang Goethe's "Löttchen."

Although he was a practicing clinician and writer and as such founded Analytical Psychology, much of his life's work was spent exploring related areas such as physics, vitalism, Eastern and Western philosophy, alchemy, astrology and sociology, as well as literature and the arts.

Analytical Psychology is the term that Jung gave to his particular form of psychotherapy.

Jung’s views evolved over many years so it is difficult to give a succinct summary of them; furthermore, Jungian analysts’ practice today builds on a century of thought and development in the field of psychotherapy and analysis.

Conclusion...

Again one is obliged to point out...

"Were Carl Jung's thoughts ever truly rational" - or did his broad range of interests perhaps cloud his thoughts or even guide him away from what he truly believed in as a satisfactory understanding and therefore treatment process of Mental disorders. Clearly demonstrated by:  

Physics, vitalism, Eastern and Western philosophy, Alchemy, Astrology, Sociology, as well as literature and the arts.

All compounded by a further interest in Philosophy and the Occult that led many to view him as a Mystic, although his preference was to be seen as a Man of Science.

Philosophy - literally. "Love of Wisdom," is the study of general and fundamental problems concerning matters such as existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind and language.

The term was probably coined by Pythagoras - c. 570–495 BCE.

Philosophical methods include questioning, critical discussion, rational argument and systematic presentation.

Classic philosophical questions include: Is it possible to know anything and to prove it.

What is most real.

Philosophers also pose more practical and concrete questions such as: Is there a best way to live.

Is it better to be just or unjust - if one can get away with it.

Do humans have free will.

Historically, "philosophy" encompassed any body of knowledge.

From the time of Ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle to the 19th century, "natural philosophy" encompassed astronomy, medicine and physics.

For example, Newton's 1687 Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy later became classified as a book of physics.

In the 19th century, the growth of modern research universities led Academic Philosophy and other disciplines to professionalize and specialize.

In the modern era, some investigations that were traditionally part of philosophy became separate academic disciplines, including psychology, sociology, linguistics and economics.

Other investigations closely related to art, science, politics, or other pursuits remained part of philosophy.

For example, is beauty objective or subjective?

Are there many scientific methods or just one.

Is political utopia a hopeful dream or hopeless fantasy.

Major sub-fields of academic philosophy include metaphysics; "concerned with the fundamental nature of reality and being," epistemology - about the "nature and grounds of knowledge and its limits and validity," ethics, aesthetics, political philosophy, logic, philosophy of science and the history of Western philosophy.

Since the 20th century, professional philosophers contribute to society primarily as professors, researchers and writers.

However, many of those who study philosophy in undergraduate or graduate programs contribute in the fields of law, journalism, politics, religion, science, business and various art and entertainment activities.

Or is it possible that Carl Jung's findings were so heavily influenced by Pythagoras and Aristotle - nothing wrong in that, that he lost his own way in the Intellectual Dreaming that we can consider Philosophy really is because he was so controlled and perhaps contrived by hos own early life - nothing wrong in that, he was unable to truly observe the wisdom of his finding expressed as Cause and effect.

Is it furthermore a clear demonstration the Jung had albeit unwittingly with. "Vitalism," rewritten Mesmer's work of Mesmerism of some fifty or so years ealier.

Quote Peter Smith Talking Cures: The Life we lead is 100% what happens to us first-hand and 100% how we react to it - this includes all illness.

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Jung's Work.

Analytical Psychology.

Section. 23.

Analytical Psychology - sometimes Analytic Psychology, also called Jungian Psychology, is a school of psychotherapy which originated in the ideas of Carl Jung, a Swiss psychiatrist.

It emphasizes the importance of the individual psyche and the personal quest for wholeness.

Important concepts in Jung's system are individuation, symbols, the personal unconscious, the collective unconscious, archetypes, complexes, the persona, the shadow, the anima and animus, and the self.

Jung's theories have been investigated and elaborated by Toni Wolff, Marie-Louise von Franz, Jolande Jacobi, Aniela Jaffé, Erich Neumann, James Hillman and Anthony Stevens.

Analytical Psychology is distinct from Psychoanalysis, which is a Psychotherapeutic System created by Sigmund Freud.

Jung started his medical career working in the Burghölzli hospital in Zurich, where he worked with disturbed and psychotic individuals.

He used word association tests to try to understand what it was that was problematic for the individual.

In these tests the Person is read a list of up to 100 words and the time they take to respond with an associated word is noted down. E.G. “Water” … “ocean” - 6 seconds; the longer the time it takes for the Person to respond the more the word was thought to be associated with a particular, problematic complex, that is a collection of images, ideas and feelings.

However, this brief sketch provides an outline to the roots and trunk of Analytical Psychology as it is practiced.

Question. May we further explore Jung's work - perhaps as it is practiced today?

Answer. Whilst we may be repeating items - it must be reasonable to accept this is a necessity in the light of the 2017 complexities of Mental ill health Treatments, thus worthy of a 2017 update within my conclusions.

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Complexes and Archetypes.

Section. 24.

These complexes can be associated with particularly difficult experiences in the past or with archetypal qualities, such as masculinity or aggression, that the individual has not been able to harness or deal with.

In parallel, Jung discovered from working with psychotic individuals that their experiences fell into certain patterns and that, furthermore, each of our psyches are structured by these patterns. He called these patterns. Archetypes.

He understood one or more Archetypes to be at the core of each complex.

For example, someone might be said to have a ‘Mother complex,’ who had particular difficulties with their early experience with their Mother and who was not therefore able to humanize the powerful forces related to the Archetype of the Mother.

Conclusion...

Whilst there may well be an element of truth to Jung's thoughts as above.

Even during the revelation of Psychological Understanding - it can be seen here; there was, as now, a desperate attempt to put a Person suffering a Psychological or Even Biological disorder into a Diagnostic Label, that makes them understandable.

Yet at the same time strips away their ability of being a Human.

Or is it more simple that that in Jung's terms - once a Person is given a diagnostic label they are now of a Collective Understanding.   

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Collaboration with Freud.

Section. 25.

Jung came to collaborate with Sigmund Freud, the originator of psychoanalysis, in developing and popularising psychoanalysis in its early days.

For a time their work complemented each other, however, after some years, the fundamental differences between their beliefs and their own personalities became manifest and in 1913, they each went their separate ways.

Conclusion... 

Is it not very sad two brilliant Men in the Field of Psychology should separate and make public their differences instead of working out why they had the difference of opinion and then with the answer put the two principle together to form perhaps a treatment regime of Mind and Body that actually worked.

Or was it this only happened as neither desired to see their real truth - as it was too painful.

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The Purposive, Self-Regulating Psyche.

Section. 26.

Fundamental to Jung’s view of the Psyche; meaning the Human Soul, Mind, or Spirit.  - was that the Mind and the ‘Unconscious,’ could largely be trusted and that it was all the time attempting to assist the individual; in this way he saw the Psyche as self-regulating.

He contrasted this view with that of Freud, who he felt, pathologised; meaning regard or treat as psychologically abnormal, the Psyche.

Always looking for problems or difficulties by analysing and reducing the individual’s difficulties to traumatic experiences in Childhood or to Sexual Conflicts.

Jung thought, that even problematic symptoms, such as anxiety or depression, could be potentially helpful in drawing the individual’s attention to an imbalance in the Psyche.

For example, if someone becomes depressed, perhaps the way they are living their life means that they are not following a path that is natural and true to their particular personality.

He understood this as being due to the purposive nature of the Psyche.

Conclusion...

Should we not consider there is an ambiguity in Jung's words. "Largely be trusted." Surely if there is the confirmation in his findings - the Mind and Unconscious are realities; either the Mind and Unconscious can be trusted or not.

And if or they cannot be fully trusted - then surely it undermines the possibility of both existing and there must be another more satisfactory explanation.

Of course we can accept the difference of opinion of Jung and Freud on the Psyche; however when one examines its said components - is it still wise to use just one label. The Psyche - the Human Mind, Soul or Spirit as it appears clear this process has never provided the effective treatments desired.

If this is truly so that Freud was always looking for problems or difficulties by analysing and reducing the individual’s difficulties to Traumatic experiences in Childhood or to Sexual Conflicts.

Then it is time we opened up the debate about mental illness as clearly Jung's dissent had an impact keeping up his own words of wisdom of Darkness instead of the Light we all have a fundamental right too. 

For; Traumatic Experiences in Childhood happen on an extremely regular bases for all the Childs Life - whereas Sexual Conflicts or abuse no less traumatic; only happen on an ad hoc, or irregular bases. 

Although Jung thought, that even problematic symptoms, such as anxiety or depression, could be potentially helpful in drawing the individual’s attention to an imbalance in the Psyche - to truly understand the implications of this; we must first recognise.

The Psyche is as a result of Life's experiences be they negative of positive and Anxiety and Depression are symptoms of the very same process.

Therefore are in reality both the same and cannot be used  either way to make understandings of the other.

We all know what the Phenotype is - the shape we become from the egg and sperm fertilisation process. The Emotional Phenotype on the other hand is the image we show the world based on the collective of all our own and our Parents life experiences.

From this was can conclude Jung was not entirely correct in his Hypotheses.

"For example, if someone becomes depressed, perhaps the way they are living their life means that they are not following a path that is natural and true to their particular personality."

He may well have intended to say. "That they are not following a path that is natural and true leads someone to becomes depressed." Sadly close allies and professional colleagues denied this of him.

Therefore as he understood; "this as being due to the purposive nature of the Psyche." Could in reality not possibly be the truth.

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The Self.

Section. 27.

Jung also thought that the way that we see ourselves - our Ego, is limited and that, ‘Modern Man,’ has become cut off from his true, instinctual nature.

He thought that we need to listen to ourselves and to come to discover who we really are and what we really feel.

He came to believe that we need to be guided by what he called the self, which is an Unconscious sense of the Personality as a whole, an Archetypal image of the individual’s full potential.

Conclusion...

One could look in a Mirror naked as nature intended every day for the whole of ones life and still not see ones "Ego" or "self" thus is not limited to Modern Mankind but all life - since the creation of life.

Moreover our so called Ego is only an expression of which we do not understand and a symptom of our Emotional Phenotype or collective of all life's experiences including from conception.

As Animals we are all guided by the Innate (cutely expressed as the Unconscious) information embedded in our Mind at conception and driven by the ever increasing store of information from conception and every second of life.

Thus the self is only a Product or a symptoms of all of the collective of information.   

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Individuation.

Section. 28.

He thought that the self acts as a guiding principle within the personality and that following its lead brings about a development of the personality.

He described this natural process of development as individuation.

This process involves moving toward the manifestation of all the natural elements of the personality.

As Jung put it: “Only what is really oneself has the power to heal.”

This process is never complete as the individual is always reacting to the new, changing situation and must accommodate new parts and configurations of themselves in order to do so.

Conclusion...  

Had Jung realised - the "Self," is no more than a symptom of the collective of all Mind stored Information; he would never have made this comment without recognising the understanding it provided.

"This process is never complete as the individual is always reacting to the new, changing situation and must accommodate new parts and configurations of themselves in order to do so."

As the self is an ever expanding part of this process created and maintained by the Mind.

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The Shadow.

Section. 29.

Those elements of the "self," which have not been integrated into the Conscious Personality - Jung called the Shadow.

These elements are sometimes in the Shadow because the qualities and functions are denied or disowned because the Person feels they are unacceptable.

These might typically be, ‘negative,’ apparently destructive parts of the personality, like aggression or envy - although Jung would say that all aspects of the personality - light and dark - are necessary for the personality - if it is to become whole and well-grounded.

For other People it might be the vulnerable, sensitive or loving qualities that are denied – a Person’s particular family or culture will have a strong influence on this.

Conclusion...

One has to question "How is it possible for the "Self" to be integrated with the "Conscious" - even if we accept the Conscious as an entity exists; when both are no more than symptoms of the Emotional Phenotype.

Thus to term them as. The Shadow is pure Philosophical Dreaming on Carl Jung's part.

Confirmed by. "These elements are sometimes in the Shadow because the qualities and functions are denied or disowned because the Person feels they are unacceptable."

If one was able to comprehend - when a Human  has Psychological Disorders; they have not the slightest degree of Self control over, not only the cause, but, the ever changing outcome of Mental or Physical symptoms and it is at this time only.

They may feel or Emotional Phenotype express their symptoms are unacceptable; but only to gain an understanding of the cause from the creator of the cause.

In accepting all aspects of the personality - light and dark - are necessary for the personality - if it is to become whole and well-grounded.

We must therefore  accept.

Aggression and or Envy - are only a form of illness symptoms and not a cause or part of the positive personality, only negative.

Thus for a Person to be well grounded they must - as a fundamental right; not a gift, be free of Mental and or Physical Symptoms that require professional intervention or guidance.

There can be no question - had Carl Jung's work, thesis and dissertation contained this as a secure finding; the outcome would not have been a. "Hypotheses," it would have been a pure Clinical Pearl.

"A Person’s particular family or culture will have a strong influence on this."

That would have most securely changed the face of Mental ill Health intervention for the good of every Person on the Planet.   

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Type Theory.

Section. 30.

Another reason for particular qualities to remain in the Shadow are that they are simply undeveloped.

Jung thought that each of us developed certain functions of the personality as primary, which he saw as dominant or superior functions, whilst others were less well developed, which he called auxiliary functions and those that were very little developed he called inferior functions.

Conclusion. This surely is only talking about the growth of a Child from Conception, Birth - until maturity; that is ever changing until Death do take us all.

And nothing to do with Mental illness or even Physical illness.   

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The Four Functions.

Section. 31.

Jung identified four different functions – thinking, feeling, sensation and intuition - corresponding to the ancient division of functions into air, water, earth and fire.

Which he saw as an individual’s different ways of engaging with the world.

Much misunderstanding occurs between People who have different functions as primary and who will, consequently, see the world in very different ways.

Jung understood that in the process of individuation a Person will need to develop their inferior functions – whatever that was for the particular individual; so that they do not simply project those functions onto other People.

For example, the intellectual, thinking type who looks down on the sensual, sports-loving, sensation type.

As Jung writes, “Everything that irritates us about others can lead to an understanding of ourselves.”

Conclusion...

Is it not a fair evaluation that Jung's "thinking, feeling, sensation and intuition - corresponding to the ancient division of functions into air, water, earth and fire."

Is nothing short of Alchemy  - the medieval forerunner of chemistry and is nothing in real terms of value to do with the workings and understandings of a Human Mind.

Although we must at the same time accept "thinking, feeling, sensation and intuition," are some  of the many tools we use in order to not only engage with the world but allow the world to engage with us.

Much of the misunderstanding that occurs between People comes from Medical Science themselves and is still as powerful today as ever as the entire profession still runs rings around the Mind as if it had some magic power of destruction and the brain is passive.

Whilst it is possible the although Carl Jung started this understanding off - "still today the truth it speaks volumes of; is unnoticed.

"The intellectual, thinking type who looks down on the sensual, sports-loving, sensation type."  

If so; does it suggest Jung, not only in real terms knew very little, his partner in crime Freud, was no different.

Leading one to accept.

“Everything that irritates us about others can lead to an understanding of ourselves.”

Is only of value if one is able to be the other Person and in so doing feel and think as they.

To demonstrate this - try seeing the mirror image of a Person by taking their place in front of a mirror.  

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Introversion and Extroversion.

Section. 32.

He also identified two different attitudes to the world – those individuals who reacted more overtly to the world and who were more excited by and engaged with it, he called Extroverts; whilst those who did not outwardly show their reactions but kept them inside and developed more of an interest in their inner world, he called Introverts.

Jung acknowledged that he developed his type theory partly in order to better understand the differences between himself and Freud, although he found it very useful in understanding People and, in particular, the way they relate to others.

Conclusion... 

In Jung's own words he only developed the Introversion and Extraversion as a result of the conflict between himself and Freud.

Leaving one to accept. “Everything that irritates us about others can lead to an understanding of ourselves.” Is only of value if one is able to be the other Person and in so doing feel and think as they.

Thus - Was no more than idle words with no real rational; had Jung been able to include or work with...

"An introvert is an Extrovert and Extrovert is an Introvert," based on.

"An Introvert will rise to the occasion and an Extrovert will always fall to the occasion - given time."

Our understanding of Mental and indeed Physical ill health may well have been better today than it really is.  

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Dreams.

Section. 33.

One way of understanding what is going on in the Psyche, that Jung came to value almost above all others, are Dreams.

He thought that; “they show us the unvarnished, natural truth.”

He believed that Dreams do not disguise their content, unlike Freud, who thought dreams expressed forbidden wishes that are concealed in the Dream.

Jung thought that Dreams express themselves through the use of symbols and that it was the difficulty understanding these symbols that could make the Dream hard to comprehend.

He had a number of characteristic ways of approaching Dreams.

Conclusion... 

The clue to understanding Jung's intentions with this section is in the word. "Thought," for within this; it is clear.

"Thoughts" when in comes to understanding the Psychology of Humans let alone illness, is not much different to Philosophical Dreaming.

Or any attempt to understand Dreams is only of value to the interpreter and of no value for the Person doing the Dreaming.

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Spirituality and Religion.

Section. 34.

Jung found that the experience of listening to and being guided by the self - corresponds with what has been understood over the millennia, as spiritual experience.

He wrote: Among all my Patients in the second half of life – that is to say, over thirty-five; there has not been one whose problem in the last resort was not that of finding a religious outlook on life.

This of course has nothing whatever to do with a particular creed or membership of a church.

The basis for this understanding was that the individual needs to pass beyond their immediate everyday experience, embodied in the ego and to come into relationship with the self, which is sometimes experienced, in a ‘numinous’ and awe-inspiring way.

This is a transformative experience for the individual and one that moves their centre of gravity away from petty, personal self-centeredness towards a broader view of themself, more in touch with and related to other People.

Conclusion...

Whilst I would have to suggest in reality there never has been room for Spirituality and Religion in the process of Mental and Physical illness and the effectiveness of treatments - for the time perhaps we can excuse Jung, Freud Et EL.

Such understandings and approaches will not be of any value today no more than it was then - for all it will do is inspire short-term symptom management.

Moreover if a Person with Mind and or Body disorders has to result  to finding a religious outlook on life. Is not the conclusion one must make...

The medical Profession was not up to the task of treating the ever changing Mind and Body symptoms - to a cure.

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The Analytic Relationship.

Section. 35.

Jung wrote of the relationship between analyst and analysand being the Person in Analysis; that. The meeting of two personalities is like the contact of two chemical substances: if there is any reaction, both are transformed.

He saw this as a very real relationship in which both People are involved and he was very much aware of the role of the analyst’s own personality in an analysis.

He knew how deeply the analyst could be affected by the analysand and he understood that the analyst must struggle first-hand with these effects and that this struggle was an essential part of the work of the analysis.

Jung was the first Person to insist that the analyst should have analysis themselves as part of their training.

The analyst could only assist the analysand as far as they had committed themselves to/in their own development.

Conclusion... 

For the heady days of Jung and Freud and the earlier others this may well nave been the correct approach - yet can we truly accept; if one as a therapist runs a modern therapy practise by Jung's rules is it possible practitioner Burn Out will be more prevalent than not.

How would this process be improved as therapist and clinicians if we all adopted the policy of. "Believing everything we hear and believing nothing." 

This process when fully incorporated in ones life and therapeutic practise - allows one to not judge truth or lies and work accordingly with the information; without self creating exhaustion.

For to Judge others at all let alone harshly - untimely forces one to turn one's critical eye on oneself and criticises more harshly.   

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Other Areas of Jung’s thought.

Section. 36.

As well as focusing on clinical, therapeutic studies, Jung was also interested in a wide range of further interests, from theoretical physics, to philosophy and, in particular, the study of religion.

Conclusion. Is it possible that this process made life far too complicated for Jung to fully understand the true implication's of his findings and in so doing create an effective therapeutic application.

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Overview.

Section. 37.

Jung began his career as a psychiatrist in Zürich, Switzerland. There, he conducted research for the Word Association Experiment at the Burghölzli Clinic.

Jung's research earned him a worldwide reputation and numerous honours, including an honorary degree from Clark University, Massachusetts, in 1904; another honorary degree from Harvard University in 1936; recognition from the University of Oxford and the University of Calcutta and appointment as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine, England.

In 1907, Jung met Sigmund Freud in Vienna, Austria.

For six years, the two scholars worked together and in 1911, they founded the International Psychoanalytical Association, of which Jung was the first president.

However, early in the collaboration, Jung observed that Freud would not tolerate ideas that were different from his own.

In 1912, Jung's Psychology of the Unconscious. "Wandlungen und Symbole der Libido" was published - re-published as "Symbols of Transformation" in 1952.

The work's innovative ideas contributed to a new foundation in Psychology as well as the end of the Jung-Freud friendship in 1913.

The two scholars continued their work on personality development independently: Jung's approach is called Analytical Psychology and Freud's approach is referred to as the Psychoanalytic School, which he founded.

Unlike most modern Psychologists, Jung did not believe that experiments using Natural Science that seek to understand how the world and universe around us works.

There are five major branches: Chemistry, Astronomy, Earth Science, Physics and Biology; that were thought to be the only means to gain an understanding of the Human Psyche.

He saw as empirical - concerned with, or verifiable by observation or experience rather than theory or pure logic,. evidence the world of dream, myth and folklore as the promising road to deeper understanding and meaning.

That method's choice is related with his choice of the object of his science.

As Jung said, "The beauty about the Unconscious is that it is really Unconscious."

Hence, the Unconscious is 'Untouchable' by experimental researches, or indeed any possible kind of scientific or philosophical reach, precisely because it is Unconscious.

Although the Unconscious cannot be studied by using direct approaches, it is, according to Jung at least, a useful hypothesis.

His postulated Unconscious was quite different from the model that was proposed by Freud, despite the great influence that the founder of psychoanalysis had on Jung.

Question. May we explore the Unconscious Mind?

Answer...

Most of Jung's assumptions of his Analytical Psychology reflect his theoretical differences with Freud.

For example, while Jung agreed with Freud that a Person’s past and Childhood experiences determined future behavior, he also believed that we are shaped by our future aspirations too.

Concluding with. The unconscious Mind is much like an iceberg below the surface

In Freud's psychoanalytic theory of personality, the Unconscious Mind is a reservoir of feelings, thoughts, urges and memories that are outside of our Conscious awareness.

Most of the contents of the Unconscious are Unacceptable or Unpleasant, such as feelings of: Pain, Anxiety, or conflict.

According to Freud, the Unconscious continues to influence our behavior and experience, even though we are unaware of these underlying influences.

The Unconscious Mind: Below the Surface of Awareness

The Unconscious Mind is often represented as an iceberg.

Everything above the water represents Conscious awareness while everything below the water represents the Unconscious.

The things that represent our Conscious Awareness are simply; "the tip of the iceberg."

The rest of the information that is outside of Conscious Awareness lies below the surface.

While this information might not be accessible Consciously, it still exerts an influence over current behavior.

Freud believed that many of our feelings, desires and emotions are repressed or held out of awareness. Why?

Because, he suggested, they were simply too threatening.

Freud believed that sometimes these hidden desires and wishes make themselves known through dreams and slips of the tongue; aka. "Freudian slips."

Question. How Is Unconscious Information Brought Into Awareness?

Answer...

Freud also believed that he could bring these unconscious feelings into awareness through the use of a technique called Free Association. 

He asked Patients to relax and say whatever came to mind without any consideration of how trivial, irrelevant, or embarrassing it might be.

By tracing these streams of thought, Freud believed he could uncover the contents of the Unconscious Mind where repressed desires and Painful Childhood memories existed.

The most well-known difference is the assumption of the Collective Unconscious - known as Jungian Archetypes, although Jung's proposal of Collective Unconscious and Archetypes was based on the assumption of the existence of Psychic - Mental, Patterns.

These Patterns include Conscious contents - thoughts, memories, etc, from life experience.

They are common for all Human beings.

Question. Did Jung provide or suggest any proof of the vast Collective Unconscious.

Answer...

It was through his concept of synchronicity, that inexplicable, uncanny connectedness that we all share he suggested was proof.

With. The overarching goal of Jungian Psychology is the attainment of self through individuation.

Question. How did Jung define. "Self?"

Answer...

As the "Archetype of wholeness and the regulating center of the Psyche."

Which is central to this process and is the individual's encounter with his/her Psyche and the bringing of its elements into Consciousness.

Question. How did he express the Humans experience?

Answer...

Through the Unconscious through symbols encountered in all aspects of life: in Dreams, Art, Religion and the symbolic dramas we enact in our relationships and life pursuits.

Essential to this numinous encounter is the merging of the individual's Consciousness with the Collective Consciousness through this symbolic language.

Question. Did this process demonstrate it was effective in relieving Mental ill health problems?

Answer...

It was thought by bringing conscious awareness to what is not Conscious, Unconscious elements can be integrated with Consciousness when they "surface."

However this possibly can be challenged all these years later - by observing the longer-term outcome following the application of his treatment as. Neurosis" results from a disharmony between the individual's (un)consciousness and higher Self.

Because the Psyche is a self-regulating adaptive system.

Moreover Humans are energetic systems and if the energy gets blocked, the Psyche gets stuck, or sick.

If adaptation is thwarted, the Psychic energy stops flowing and regresses.

This process manifests in Neurosis and Psychosis.

Question. Why did Jung suggest Human Psychic contents are complex and deep?

Answer...

Because they can schism, split and form complexes that take over one's personality.

Proposing that this occurs through maladaptation to one's external or internal realities.

Where the principles of adaptation, projection and compensation are central processes in the Psyche's ability to adapt.

Question. What then is the true aim of psychotherapy?

Answer. To assist the individual in reestablishing a healthy relationship to the Unconscious: neither flooded by it - characteristic of Psychosis, such as Schizophrenia or out of balance in relationship to it - as with Neurosis, a state that results in Depression, Anxiety and Personality Disorders.

Question. How does one undergo the individuation process?

Answer. Individuals must be open to the parts of themselves beyond their own ego.

Question.  How does the modern individual grow continually in Psychic Awareness?

Answer. Jung suggested by paying attention to Dreams, explore the world of Religion as well as Spirituality and question the assumptions of the operant societal worldview - rather than just blindly live life in accordance with dominant norms and assumptions.

Conclusion...

We can discuss Jung and indeed his companion Freud in more ways than we have thus far - however does it not always come down to the Long-Term outcome of the treatment regimes they created.

That the evidence clearly suggests treatments for Mind related disorders are still very much in their infancy - back far beyond the birth of the two philosophers that apparently changed the world of Psychical understandings. 

And as Jung said, "The beauty about the Unconscious is that it is really Unconscious." So we are safe from our own traumatic memories.

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Fundamentals.

Unconscious.

Section. 38.

The basic assumption is that the Personal Unconscious is a potent part - probably the more active part of the normal Human Psyche.

Reliable communication between the Conscious and Unconscious parts of the Psyche is necessary for wholeness.

Also crucial is the belief that Dreams show ideas, beliefs and feelings that individuals are not readily aware of but need to be and that such material is expressed in a personalized vocabulary of visual metaphors.

Things 'known but unknown,' are contained in the Unconscious and Dreams are one of the main vehicles for the Unconscious to express them.

Analytical Psychology distinguishes between a Personal Unconscious and a Collective Unconscious.

The Collective Unconscious contains Archetypes common to all Human beings.

That is, individuation may bring to surface symbols that do not relate to the life experiences of a single Person.

This content is more easily viewed as answers to the more fundamental questions of humanity: Life, Death, meaning, Happiness and or fear.

Among these more spiritual concepts may arise and be integrated into the personality.

Conclusion...

Is it possible Jung was only Dreaming when he created the Unconscious and as such the outcome of his dreams  failed to show the true and satisfactory results of the ideas he so desperately desired.

Surely Jung must have known even in those days.

Unconscious meant exactly as it said Unconscious - meaning knocked out and was it this process without the realisation required that led Freud and himself to have such a dramatic falling out over ideas as in reality they were both not correct in their assertions; for had they been today we would collectively have a better understanding and treatment of all illness.  

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Collective Unconscious.

Section. 39.

Jung's concept of the Collective Unconscious has often been misunderstood.

To understand this concept, it is essential to understand Jungian Archetypes.

Conclusion. Perhaps we should ask was it Carl Jung that was confused not by the collective Unconscious and The Jungian Archetypes -but the very foundations of his life - he stood on.

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Section. 40.

The use of Psychological Archetypes was advanced by Jung in 1919.

In Jung's Psychological framework, Archetypes are innate, universal prototypes for ideas and may be used to interpret observations.

A group of memories and interpretations associated with an Archetype is a complex, e.g. a Mother complex associated with the Mother Archetype.

Jung treated the Archetypes as Psychological organs, analogous to physical ones in that both are morphological givens that arose through evolution.

The Archetypes are collective as well as individual.

One can create their own Archetypes, based on an ideal one wants to emulate e.g. respect or fear.

Archetypes can grow on their own and present themselves in a variety of creative ways.

Jung, in his book: Memories, Dreams, Reflections, states that he began to see and talk to a manifestation of anima and that she taught him how to Interpret Dreams.

As soon as he could interpret on his own, Jung said that she ceased talking to him because she was no longer needed.

Conclusion...

One can create their own Archetypes, based on an ideal one wants to emulate e.g. respect or fear.

Can we ask all these years later when he said; "that she ceased talking to him," The most serious possibility he was refereing to his Mother and he interpreted this through his dreams.

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Section. 41.

Neuroticism is one of the Big Five higher-order Personality traits in the study of Psychology.

Individuals who score high on Neuroticism are more likely than average to be moody and to experience such feelings as: Anxiety, Worry, Fear, Anger, Frustration, Envy, Jealousy, Guilt, Depressed Mood and loneliness.

An innate need for self-realization leads People to explore and integrate these disowned parts of themselves.

This natural process is called individuation, or the process of becoming an individual.

According to Jung, self-realization is attained through individuation.

His is an Adult Psychology, divided into two distinct tiers.

In the first half of our lives, we separate from humanity.

We attempt to create our own identities - I, myself.

This is why there is such a need for young men to be destructive and can be expressed as animosity from teens directed at their Parents.

Jung also said - we have a sort of "second puberty.." That occurs between ages 35 and 40: outlook shifts from emphasis on materialism, sexuality and having Children; to concerns about community and spirituality.

In the second half of our lives, Humans reunite with the Human race.

They become part of the collective once again.

This is when adults start to contribute to humanity - volunteer time, build, garden, create art, etc, rather than destroy.

They are also more likely to pay attention to their Unconscious and Conscious feelings.

Young men rarely say: "I feel angry," or, "I feel sad."

This is because they have not yet rejoined the Human collective experience, commonly reestablished in their older, wiser years, according to Jung.

A common theme is for young rebels to "search," for their true-selves and realize that a contribution to humanity is essentially a necessity for a whole self.

Jung proposes that the ultimate goal of the collective unconscious and self-realization is to pull us to the highest experience.

This, of course, is Spiritual.

If a Person does not proceed toward self-knowledge, Neurotic Symptoms may arise.

Symptoms are widely defined, including, for instance, Phobias, Psychosis and Depression.

Conclusion...

When one compares Jung's findings. "His is an Adult Psychology, divided into two distinct tiers."

And includes. 

"This is why there is such a need for young men to be destructive and can be expressed as animosity from teens directed at their Parents."

It becomes clear. Jung was actually running away from his own early Childhood problems - nothing wrong in that,  however if one evaluates this against his; "this, of course, is Spiritual.

Meaning; if a Person does not proceed toward self-knowledge.

Neurotic Symptoms may arise, where Symptoms are widely defined, as including, for instance, Phobias, Psychosis and Depression.

Thereby; leaving us to observe once again. Jung was evading the truth of his own Childhood Traumatic Experiences, at the expense of his friendship with Freud and the full satisfaction of his findings; that would have been more of value, not only to himself, but the generations of People in need within his distant future.   

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Shadow.

Section. 42.

The Shadow is an Unconscious complex defined as the repressed, suppressed or disowned qualities of the Conscious self.

According to Jung, the Human being deals with the reality of the Shadow in four ways: Denial, Projection, Integration and/or Transmutation.

According to Analytical Psychology, a Person's Shadow may have both constructive and destructive aspects.

In its more destructive aspects, the Shadow can represent those things People do not accept about themselves.

For instance, the Shadow of someone who identifies as being kind may be harsh or unkind.

Conversely, the Shadow of a Person who perceives himself to be brutal may be gentle.

In its more constructive aspects, a Person's Shadow may represent hidden positive qualities.

This has been referred to as; the. "Gold in the Shadow."

Jung emphasized the importance of being aware of Shadow material and incorporating it into Conscious Awareness in order to avoid projecting Shadow qualities on others.

The Shadow in Dreams is often represented by dark figures of the same Gender as the Dreamer.

The Shadow may also concern great figures in the history of Human thought or even spiritual masters, who became great because of their Shadows or because of their ability to live their Shadows - namely, their Unconscious faults, in full without repressing them.

Conclusion...

When Jung described this...

"The Shadow is an Unconscious complex defined as the repressed, suppressed or disowned qualities of the Conscious self." 

And used the term Unconscious-Conscious - all was lost, thereby confirming Jung was only; as they say in the Spiritual World of understanding. "Seeking enlightenment of his long lost self."

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Anima and Animus.

Section. 43.

Jung identified the Anima as being the Unconscious Feminine component of Men and the Animus as the Unconscious Masculine component in Women.

However, this is rarely taken as a literal definition: many modern-day Jungian practitioners believe that every Person has both an Anima and Animus.

Jung stated that the Anima and Animus act as guides to the Unconscious unified Self and that forming an awareness and a connection with the Anima or Animus is one of the most difficult and rewarding steps in Psychological growth.

Jung reported that he identified his Anima; as She spoke to him as an inner voice, unexpectedly one day.

Often, when People ignore the Anima or Animus complexes, the Anima or Animus vies for attention by projecting itself on others.

This explains, according to Jung, why we are sometimes immediately attracted to certain strangers: we see our Anima or Animus in them.

Love at first sight is an example of Anima and Animus projection.

Moreover, People who strongly identify with their gender role, e.g. a Man who acts aggressively and never cries, have not actively recognized or engaged their Anima or Animus.

Jung attributes Human rational thought to be the Male nature, while the irrational aspect is considered to be natural Female rational - being defined as involving judgment, irrational being defined as involving Perceptions.

Consequently, irrational moods are the progenies of the Male Anima shadow and irrational opinions of the Female Animus Shadow.

Conclusion. Fortunately these terms. "Anima and Animus," are not in use today and a good job too - for anyone that ever did or still does use such terminology not only demonstrates they have no knowledge of Humans at all; be they as a Person Male or Female, they have equal importance in life as they should have in seeking well health. When there is none. 

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Wise old Man / Woman.

Section. 44.

After the confrontation with the soul-image the appearance of the Old Wise Man, the personification of the spiritual principle, can be distinguished as the next milestone of inner development.

As Archetypes of the Collective Unconscious, such figures can be seen as, in Psychological terms, a symbolic personification of the Self.

Conclusion...

Surly - when a Person is ill in any manner - they have either...

Had their wisdom not given to them as an innate right, not a gift, or had it removed by Emotional and or Physical traumas in early life.

Thus in real terms can never be as wise as they ought to be, confirmed by whilst it is a Persons right to think they have a soul.

It is and should be a private matter for it has still not in late 2017 been demonstrated the Soul exists anywhere in the body; other than as a Thought or memory in the intangible Mind that no electronic wizardry has ever or will ever show the site in the Mind, the soul exists.  

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Section. 45.

Analysis is a way to experience and integrate the unknown material.

It is a search for the meaning of behaviours, symptoms and events.

Many are the channels to reach this greater self-knowledge.

The Analysis of Dreams is the most common.

Others may include expressing feelings in art pieces, poetry or other expressions of creativity.

Giving a complete description of the process of Dream Interpretation and individuation is complex.

The nature of the complexity lies in the fact that the process is highly specific to the Person who does it.

While Freudian Psychoanalysis assumes that the repressed material hidden in the Unconscious is given by Repressed Sexual instincts,

Analytical Psychology has a more general approach.

There is no preconceived assumption about the Unconscious Material.

The Unconscious, for Jungian Analysts, may contain repressed sexual drives, but also aspirations, fears, etc.

Conclusion...

Sadly whilst we can appreciate the input both Jung and Freud had for their time - was an amazing feat of endurance against the tide of suppression both felt; if only from their colleagues in the medical profession, let alone their Parents and other significant Persons in their life.

For - whilst a Person seeking an Analyst to unravel their complex lifestyle activity may well be pleased with the results especially in the interpretation of their Dreams; the outcome will or can only be of a short-term duration, as the Mind is far to clever and will only pretend its complex life had been Analysed to satisfaction and its Dreams explained away by a Person that not only cannot, must not attempt to interpret another's Dreams or Nightmares. As they are never ever about the content.

Dreams and Nightmares and any information the Person no longer has access too yet is causing emotional and or physical concerns are hidden on purpose by the Persons Mind - as the now memories; are far to painful to remember.     

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What to Expect During a Session with a Jungian Therapist 2017.

Section. 46.

One gives up that second glass of wine with dinner, only to discover that without realising it has been replaced with a late-night bowl of ice cream. Why?

A Jungian therapist understands that in order to create lasting change, one must go beyond the merely cosmetic, to the true source of an Anxiety, Depression and Destructive Life patterns.

Jungian therapy differs from other therapeutic traditions in that it emphasizes the importance of the Unconscious Mind and seeks to engage the Patient in a process of transformation that goes well beyond symptom relief.

So what can you expect during a session with a Jungian therapist?

A. Jungian therapist will ask the Person to explore their Dreams, Stories, Fantasies and Personal myths as a way to better understand the workings of their Unconscious Mind.

They will engage in a dialogue designed to help peel back the layers of Conscious Understanding, to reveal what is really driving life's actions.

A Jungian therapist will ask a Patient to examine their life  both past and present - in a Conscious manner.

Requesting the Person move beyond the realm of; "I do not know" and engage in Rigorous Personal Inquiry.

Creating a desire to explore ones motivations, with the goal of creating a bridge between the Conscious and the Unconscious Mind.

A Jungian therapist will not offer a series of quick-fixes and Band-Aids to solve ones problems.

Rather, the therapist will emphasize the importance of creating change from the inside/out.

If this sounds like an intense process - it is.

Yet, if a Person is willing to do the work, the pay-off can go well beyond changing a few bad habits.

A Jungian therapist can lead one on a journey of self-discovery that culminates in a true and lasting transformation.

As the divide between the Conscious and Unconscious Mind starts to dissolve, change no longer becomes a question of willpower or inner resolve, but originates from the very core.

Ultimately finding a wellspring of creativity, energy and passion previously unavailable and a sense of peace rooted in deep self-knowledge.

Question. It is said. "A Jungian therapist understands that in order to create lasting change, one must go beyond the merely cosmetic, to the true source of an Anxiety, Depression and Destructive Life patterns. Does this hold today and has it been improved on?

Answer. Whilst there is a Therapeutic beauty in this Jungian expression. "Engage in Rigorous Personal Inquiry." One would have to question has the true source of: Anxiety, Depression and Destructive Life patterns really been satisfactorily explored with the goal of creating a bridge between the Conscious and the Unconscious Mind.

Question. From this information we can consider that Carl Jung and his findings played an important role in the Understanding of Human Psychology and that we have only scratched the surface of his musings, May we now proceed to his quotes?

Answer. Here are 19.5 (were 20 one was repeated but answered differently or was this a Freudian slip) from Jung that not only serve as an accurate representation of his work, with the intension of being used as a self-help program that provides much to reflect on...

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19.5 Profound Quotes By Carl Jung That Will Help Us To Better Understand Our Self.

Section. 47.

1.”One does not become enlightened by imagining figures of light but by making the darkness conscious.”

2. “Do not hold on to someone who is leaving, otherwise you will not meet the one who is coming.”

3. “Until one makes the Unconscious Conscious, it will direct a life and will be referred to as fate.”

4. “Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves.”

5. “The meeting of two personalities is like the contact of two chemical substances: if there is any reaction, both are transformed.”

6. “I am not what happened to me, I am what I choose to become.”

7. “Knowing ones own darkness is the best method for dealing with the darkness of other People.”

8. “If a gifted Person, it does not mean that one has gained something. It means one has something to give back.”

9. “Mistakes are, after all, the foundations of truth and if a man does not know what a thing is, it is at least an increase in knowledge - if he knows what it is not.”

10. “Visions will become clear only when one can look into ones own heart. Who looks outside, Dreams; who looks inside, Awakes.”

11. “People will do anything, no matter how absurd, to avoid facing their own souls.”

12. “Loneliness does not come from having no People around - but from being unable to communicate the things that seem important to oneself, or from holding certain views which others find inadmissible.”

13. “Depression is like a Woman in black. If she turns up, do not shoo her away. Invite her in, offer her a seat, treat her like a guest and listen to what she has to say.”

14. “A Man who has not passed through the inferno of his passions has never overcome them.”

15. “Ones perceptions will become clear - only when able to look into ones soul.”

16. “I am not what happened to me, I am what I choose to become.”

17. “What you resist, persists.”

18. “A dream is a small hidden door in the deepest and most intimate sanctum of the soul, which opens up to that primeval cosmic night that was the soul, long before there was the conscious ego.”

19. “We may think that we fully control ourselves. However, a friend can easily reveal something about us that we have absolutely no idea about.”

20. “Everything about other People that does not satisfy, helps to better understand ourselves.”

Question. If we are able to accept these are Carl Jung's findings about the Psychological processes of the Human Mind from his birth in 1875 to his death in 1961, Is it possible they can be updated to a 2017 version.

Answer. It is helpful to consider quite how remarkable Jung was in the days of no internet in becoming a world-wide influence in the understanding of psychology and the working of the Human Mind - especially following the creation of the Factional Story of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde in 1883 - that was in my opinion designed to destroy for all time the influence of the Human Mind in the creation of all illness and in so doing hide the inability of Medical Sciense ability to create any illness cures.

Below is a copy of the existing Quotes and underneath each is my 2017 version in the belief were Carl Jung to be alive today he would as a professional welcome the update.

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19.5 Profound Quotes By Carl Jung That Will Help Us To Better Understand Our Self 2017.

Section. 48.

1.”One does not become enlightened by imagining figures of light - but by making the darkness Conscious.”

1.  "One does not become the Person one should have been by Imagining; Light, Darkness or Conscious are a valuable asset." 

2. “Do not hold on to someone who is leaving, otherwise you will not meet the one who is coming.”

2.  "If placed in a position of unwittingly and negatively holding on to a Person how can we ever meet a Person coming towards us that is able to Understand."

3. “Until you make the Unconscious Conscious, it will direct your life and will call it fate.”

3.  "Whilst one excepts there is such a thing as the Unconscious and Conscious - then fate can only have a very sad ending."

4. “Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves.”

4. "Trying to Understand others is the best way of never understanding oneself."

5. “The meeting of two personalities is like the contact of two chemical substances: if there is any reaction, both are transformed.”

5. "Thus if unwittingly a Persons personality is toxic they they will only meet toxic People."

6. “I am not what happened to me, I am what I choose to become.”

6. I become only that my past experiences drive me to be, thus I have no real choice."

7. “Knowing ones own darkness is the best method for dealing with the darkness of other People.”

7.  "Unless one has special night vision - how can one see oneself in Darkness and the Darkness in others."

8. “If as a gifted Person, it does not mean that one has gained something. It means one has something to give back.”

8. "Sadly - modern life has created more takers than givers."

9. “Mistakes are, after all, the foundations of truth and if a man does not know what a thing is, it is at least an increase in knowledge - if he knows what it is not.”

9. "In life one never makes a mistake as it is always the right decision at the time."

10. “Visions will become clear only when one can look into ones own Heart. Who looks outside, Dreams; who looks inside, Awakes.”

10. If one cannot seek understanding of that what is inside the Mind - the Heart will always complain and life will always be a Dream that keeps us asleep."

11. “People will do anything, no matter how absurd, to avoid facing their own souls.”

11. "People think deep in their Subconscious Mind and Jung in his own words concured.  Do not take my illness away from me as I will not know what to do without it."

12. “Loneliness does not come from having no People around, but from being unable to communicate the things that seem important to oneself, or from holding certain views which others find inadmissible.”

12. "Loneliness is a state of  damaged Mind and nothing to do with being on ones own, that others find uncomfortable."

13. “Depression is like a Woman in black. If she turns up, do not shoo her away. Invite her in, offer her a seat, treat her like a guest and listen to what she has to say.”

13. "illness is an advantage - not in the slightest a disadvantage." Depression like all illness is a creation of the Mind that blinds us from listening to what anyone has to say - including ourselves."

14. “A Man who has not passed through the inferno of his passions has never overcome them.”

14. "The only place to find Understanding for ones woes - is deep in the traumatic event that caused the passionate inferno."

15. “Ones perceptions will become clear - only when able to look into ones soul.”

15. looking into ones Soul will only blind in terror - perception is the most valuable of emotions without no life could exist."

16. repeated. “I am not what happened to me, I am what I choose to become.”

16. "Anxiety is caused through traumatic events that forces us to become who we are not."

17. “What you resist, persists.”

17. "We only persist in what has caused us to resist."

18. “A dream is a small hidden door in the deepest and most intimate sanctum of the Soul, which opens up to that primeval cosmic night that was the Soul, long before there was the Conscious ego.”

18. "A Dream is just that -  a Dream philosophers use to explain away the impossible to understand by the belief in the Soul.

19. “We may think that we fully control ourselves. However, a friend can easily reveal something about us that we have absolutely no idea about.”

19. "No one can reveal that we have no knowledge of ourselves about - although as such; with the protection such thought processes afford us, we can pretend too loudly."

20. “Everything about other People that does not satisfy, helps to better understand ourselves.”

20. "Yet the only Person in the world with the integrity and wisdom to understand ourselves is never included in the process."

Kindest regards and best wishes,

Peter Smith Talking Cures.

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The Mind.

The truth hurts and so it should - lies and mistruths

never ever show the true damage they cause.

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Whilst it must be recognised, the framework - part of the content, for this paper is in the public domain and credit given to the authors;

Peter Smith Talking Cures asserts the right to be recognised as author and Intellectual

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"19.5 Profound Quotes By Carl Jung. "

Author Peter Smith Talking Cures Copyright 14th November 2017.

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